Jon Fisher

Birds of the Season — June 2019

March and April in southern California encompass a great deal of change in the avian world. Passerine migration transforms from a trickle to a flood, wintering birds are leaving on their various schedules and breeding activity is pervasive.

From the first early arriving passerines to the waves of birds encountered in April and May, spring migration is a remarkable event to witness. While the quality and quantity of birds can vary from day to day—often due to factors we’ve yet to understand—this is a fantastic time to take to the field.

Shorebirds can briefly be seen in their breeding colors. Loons and scoters are streaming northward along the coast. The weather is generally pleasant and the landscape is lush. It could well be argued that this time of year offers more for birders than any other.

As usual, given the diversity of habitats in Los Angeles County, the variety of birds present in March and April was substantial. Wintering vagrants gradually began to disappear as spring progressed, and there were a few new discoveries to keep things interesting. Typically for this time of year, reports of new vagrants were comparatively scarce.

Birds of the Season - February 2019

Birds of the Season - February 2019

December through February is that slow time of the bird year when nothing much of interest turns up, right?  In some years that statement may ring true, but it was hardly accurate this winter.  Some truly unexpected birds were found along with many lesser vagrants.  As usual plenty of continuing rarities were regularly reported at their respective locations.

Western Tanager, Vol. 85 No. 2, Nov-Dec 2018

Japanese Sparrow Hawk | Photo by Chukiat Nualsri

Japanese Sparrow Hawk | Photo by Chukiat Nualsri

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Western Tanager, Vol. 85 No. 2, November-December 2018

•Hawk Mountain of Thailand, By Linda Oberholtzer | Photos by: Chukiat Nualsri

•The Rufa Red Knot: A Long Distant Migrant Depends on the Delaware Bay, By Dessi Sieburth

•INTERPRETING NATURE: Connecting Science and the Spirit of Nature, By Arely Mendia Perez, Restoration & Education Staff Member; Stacey Vigallon, Director of Environmental Education

•BIRDS OF THE SEASON—October 2018, By Jon Fisher

•2018 End-of-Year Appeal, By Carol Babeli, Los Angeles Audubon’s Development Director

•Audubon California Assembly–Nov. 2-4, 2018

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 6, Jul-Aug 2018

COVER_Vol. 84 No. 6 Jul-Aug 2018.jpg

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 6, Jul-Aug 2018

• Book Review: The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Santa Barbara County, California | Kimball L. Garrett

•Green Feather Award Winner 2018: “Let Her Play” | Aisling Murray

• INTERPRETING NATURE: Baldwin Hills Greenhouse Program Research | Stacey Vigallon

• YOUNG BIRDERS: A New Discovery - Our Rufous Hummingbirds Molt in the Mexican Monsoonal Region | Dessi Sieburth

• Birds of the Season: June 2018 | Jon Fisher

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 4, Mar-Apr 2018

Owens Valley, April 2017 | Photo by Mary Freeman

Owens Valley, April 2017 | Photo by Mary Freeman

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 4, March-April 2018

  • The California Condor, By Dessi Sieburth

  • Birding in Belize: A Guide Shares His Top Five Sites, By Lisa Freeman

  • Birds of the Season—February 2018, By Jon Fisher

  • Beautiful Ballona: What’s The Latest?, By Cindy Hardin

  • In Memory of Howard King, By Nick Freeman

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 1, Sep-Oct 2017

ON THE COVER:  Shoreline, Crystal Cove, Photo by Leslie Davidson  Crystal Cove is located in Orange County off the busy Pacific Coast Highway. Crystal  Cove State Park offers hiking in the deeply wooded canyons and water activities at the tide pools and sandy beaches.  My name is Leslie Davidson and I have been a docent at the Ballona Wetlands for the past 17 years. I enjoy photographing nature and love sharing my hobby with others.  Camera: Nikon Coolpix P510

ON THE COVER: Shoreline, Crystal Cove, Photo by Leslie Davidson

Crystal Cove is located in Orange County off the busy Pacific Coast Highway. Crystal

Cove State Park offers hiking in the deeply wooded canyons and water activities at the tide pools and sandy beaches.

My name is Leslie Davidson and I have been a docent at the Ballona Wetlands for the past 17 years. I enjoy photographing nature and love sharing my hobby with others.

Camera: Nikon Coolpix P510

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Western Tanager, Vol. 84 No. 1, September-October 2017

  • PHOTO ESSAY: Audubon Docents: The Things We Saw, By Photo Essay | By Cindy Hardin, Director of Outdoor Education and Photos by Leslie Davidson

  • YOUNG BIRDERS: Project Puffin — Audubon’s Seabird Restoration Project in Maine | By Dessi Sieburth

  • Coots Make Me Smile, By Contributing Author, Bev‐Sue Powers, (www.BallonaPhotography.com)

  • INTERPRETING NATURE: Aspiring Botanist Goes Plant‐hunting from Baldwin Hills to Yosemite, By Arely Mendia Perez, Environment for the Americas Intern, and Stacey Vigallon, Director of Environmental Education

  • Birds of the Season – August 2017, By Jon Fisher

Western Tanager, Vol. 83 No. 6, Jul–Aug 2017

ON THE COVER  ‘I’iwi | Hakalau Forest Wildlife Refuge, Photo by Jack Jeffrey  Found nowhere else in the world, the spectacular scarlet‐feathered I’iwi  (Drepanis coccinea)  is the last of the sickle‐billed Hawaiian honeycreepers. Before the appearance of humans in Hawaii, more than fifty different honeycreeper species were known to have existed. Today, only 18 species remain, most of these are endangered or threatened. I’iwi feathers were once collected by early Hawaiian bird catchers or “kia manu”, and used for the feathered cloaks of Hawaiian Royalty. I’iwi are still fairly abundant in the remaining high elevation native koa‐ohia forests of Hawaii Island and Maui, but rare on the other major islands. The long down‐curved bill of the I’iwi is a perfect match for the shape of tubular flowers of many native plants, making I’iwi important pollinators of these and other native plants. To see an I’iwi, or to hear its loud “rusty hinge” call is an extraordinary experience and one that can only be had in a Hawaiian rainforest.

ON THE COVER

‘I’iwi | Hakalau Forest Wildlife Refuge, Photo by Jack Jeffrey

Found nowhere else in the world, the spectacular scarlet‐feathered I’iwi (Drepanis coccinea) is the last of the sickle‐billed Hawaiian honeycreepers. Before the appearance of humans in Hawaii, more than fifty different honeycreeper species were known to have existed. Today, only 18 species remain, most of these are endangered or threatened. I’iwi feathers were once collected by early Hawaiian bird catchers or “kia manu”, and used for the feathered cloaks of Hawaiian Royalty. I’iwi are still fairly abundant in the remaining high elevation native koa‐ohia forests of Hawaii Island and Maui, but rare on the other major islands. The long down‐curved bill of the I’iwi is a perfect match for the shape of tubular flowers of many native plants, making I’iwi important pollinators of these and other native plants. To see an I’iwi, or to hear its loud “rusty hinge” call is an extraordinary experience and one that can only be had in a Hawaiian rainforest.

In this issue

• YOUNG BIRDERS: Birds of the Hakalau Forest on the Big Island of Hawai’i, By Dessi Sieburth

• INTERPRETING NATURE: Does nature have a place in the English Language Arts classroom?, By Robert Jeffers, L.A. Audubon Treasurer | Instructional Coach

• Princeton Phainopepla Project, Please send your sightings to Dr. Daniel Baldassarre, Princeton University

• Birds of the Season—June 2017, By Jon Fisher

• OPINION: Every Creature on Earth is Under Threat, By Louis Tucker, LAAS Member and Field Trip Leader

• A Tribute to Judy Raskin, By Brad Rumble, LAAS Director at Large

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Western Tanager, Vol. 83 No. 5, May–June 2017

On The Cover:  Brown-eyed Primrose | Photo by Read Howarth   About the Photographer:  Read Howarth is a disability insurance broker who lives in Los Angeles County. He moved here in 2009 from New Jersey. His then moderate lifelong interest in birding was given a jolt with his observation of a Surf Scoter in Marina Del Rey, while sailing. His first Audubon Field Trip was three years ago, on a Kurt Leuschner led trip to Anza-Borrego. It was to become the first of many Audubon walks and field trips since. Birding, sailing and volunteering as a Docent in Topanga State Park keep him out in nature and provide springboards for more educational opportunities in the natural sciences.

On The Cover: Brown-eyed Primrose | Photo by Read Howarth

About the Photographer: Read Howarth is a disability insurance broker who lives in Los Angeles County. He moved here in 2009 from New Jersey. His then moderate lifelong interest in birding was given a jolt with his observation of a Surf Scoter in Marina Del Rey, while sailing. His first Audubon Field Trip was three years ago, on a Kurt Leuschner led trip to Anza-Borrego. It was to become the first of many Audubon walks and field trips since. Birding, sailing and volunteering as a Docent in Topanga State Park keep him out in nature and provide springboards for more educational opportunities in the natural sciences.

In this issue

• L.A. Audubon's Anza-Borrego Field Trip March 2017, By Read Howarth, LAAS Member and Field Trip Participant, Photos by Read Howarth

• Birds and Other Wildlife seen on Anza-Borrego Field TripBy Kurt Leuschner, LAAS Member and Field Trip Leader | KLeuschner@collegeofthedesert.edu

• SCHREIBER GRANT UPDATE: The role of behavior in isolation: novelty and courtship across a hummingbird hybrid zone | By Brian Myers, Grant Recipient 2015

• INTERPRETING NATURE: From L.A. to Joshua Tree: Opportunities and Experiences in Nature, By Robert Jeffers, L.A. Audubon Board Member and Joshua Tree Adventure Chaperone, Spring Break 2017

• We Wish You a Merry Christmas: An Adventure, By Louis Tucker, Los Angeles Audubon Society Member and Field Trip Leader

• YOUNG BIRDERS: The Red-crowned Parrot, By Dessi Sieburth

• Birds of the Season — April 2017, By Jon Fisher

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Western Tanager, Vol. 83 No. 2, Nov-Dec 2016

Black-crowned Night-Heron, Photo by Dessi Sieburth

Black-crowned Night-Heron, Photo by Dessi Sieburth

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Western Tanager, Vol. 83 No. 2, November December 2016

ON THE COVER

Black-crowned Night-Heron, Photo by Dessi Sieburth

•YOUNG BIRDERS: Helping Birds Through Photography, By Dessi Sieburth

•CONSERVATION CONVERSATION: Western Snowy Plovers Past and Future in Coastal Los Angeles, By Travis Longcore

•Ballona Docents Head South, Cindy Hardin, Director of Outdoor Education & Volunteer Coordinator

•State of California, Audubon California and Restoring the Salton Sea

•Birds of the Season–October 2016

•Always Excited About Your Firsts: The Chase, By Louis Tucker, Field Trip Leader

•INTERPRETING NATURE: Celebrating Shorebirds, Joyce Realgeno, Education and Restoration Staff, and Stacey Vigallon, Director of Environmental Education

Western Tanager, Vol. 82 No. 6, Jul-Aug 2016

Tejon Ranch Landscape Fields of Gold (May 2016) | Photo by Jason Koenig  This is a view of the hills shrouded in clouds as we travel west to Big Sycamore Canyon, from the 300 Street gate.

Tejon Ranch Landscape Fields of Gold (May 2016) | Photo by Jason Koenig

This is a view of the hills shrouded in clouds as we travel west to Big Sycamore Canyon, from the 300 Street gate.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

• ON THE COVER: Tejon Ranch Landscape Fields of Gold (May 2016) | Photo by Jason Koenig

• ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Jason Koenig

• TEJON RANCH: At Last We Get to Go Back up To the Mountain ‐ How ‘Ya Gonna Keep 'Em Away From The Ranch? | By Louis Tucker, Field Trip Leader for Los Angeles Audubon

• YOUNG AUTHORS: My Trip to Alaska | By Dessi Sieburth

• INTERPRETING NATURE: 2015-2016 Greenhouse Intern project abstracts | By Stacey Vigallon, Director of Interpretation, and the Baldwin Hills Greenhouse Interns

• Let's Get Outside | By Cindy Hardin, Director of Outdoor Education

• Birds of the Season—June 2016 | By Jon Fisher

• PRESS RELEASE: Your Breeding Bird Atlas Arriving Soon | By Larry Allen